Lamy Accent 4Pen

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I reviewed the Lamy 2000 Multipen and it turned out to be the most popular post I’ve written in a while so it seems like a good time to review one of Lamy’s other multipens, the Accent 4Pen. You have to give the people what they want!

I have owned the Accent for several years and it is a great pen. However, for two reasons that I’ll get to soon, it falls just a bit short for me. I really, really want to like this pen but these two issues keep holding me back. That’s not accurate. I do like this pen – quite a bit actually. I just don’t love it and I really, really want to love it.

First, some good stuff. It’s a Lamy so the build quality and classic design are both aces. My Accent is about 8 years old and over these years of not infrequent use, it has performed like a champ. There are a few scuff marks on the matte black finish here and there but that is entirely expected. I did have to replace the mechanical pencil thingy but that was my fault. I forced a piece of graphite into the mechanism and jammed it. Lamy is pretty good about replacing broken bits on their products but the malfunction was my fault and I did not feel like waiting the 3-5 weeks or paying shipping for an inexpensive repair. I forked over about $9 and bought a replacement online.

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Compared to the Lamy 2000 Multi, the Accent 4Pen is a bit heavier. While the Lamy 2000 is evenly balanced with the center of mass located very close to the middle of the body, the Accent is weighted more towards to the point. I like this forward weighting quite a bit as I feel like I have good control when writing. Also, can’t we all agree that pens weighted noticeably past the half way point and away from the point are just the worst? Anyway, the clip on the Accent is spring loaded which is pretty cool. Even cooler is the fact that the clip is rock solid showing essentially zero unwanted wiggle.

As for refills, the Accent 4Pen takes three D1 refills and a 0.7 mm mechanical pencil. There’s a lot to like with a 3 + 1 set up. It offers plenty of pen variety with the added benefit of having a pencil. The Lamy D1 ballpoint refills are some of the best around and they fit perfectly through the tip of the pen resulting is zero refill wiggle. Whether it is the 2000 or the Accent, Lamy refills feel as rock solid as any single refill retractable pen I have tried. That said, the refill hole of the Accent is a bit wider than the one on the 2000 so I do notice a bit of wiggle when the former was loaded with a slightly thinner D1 Zebra gel refill. (I do not recall coming across a wiggly refill, Lamy or otherwise, for the 2000 yet.) The mechanical pencil in the Accent is great. Like any pencil portion of a multipen, you are limited regarding the number of graphite pieces you store onboard but the pencil of the Accent is one of my favorites mechanical pencils. There is just something about the line of sight I have on the graphite and the way the hole, pencil collar and graphite line up that works really well for me.

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One key difference between the Accent and the 2000 is the retraction method. The 2000 uses the same button to deploy and retract all of the refills. The Accent uses one button to deploy the refills and a second button on the side to retract the refills. I do prefer the one button approach but maybe the two button set up is needed because of the mechanical pencil. Importantly, the retraction button is easy to depress without being so soft that you can suffer an accidental retraction (that sounds really bad).

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So far so good, right? So why does the Accent fall just a bit short for me? For starters, let’s talk about the grip section. If you look at the contours of the pen, you see that the widest part of the pen is the grip section. The width is not really my problem. My problem is that the grip section is pretty darn hard and gets uncomfortable after a few minutes of use. It is actually more complicated than that though. The pen refills do not stick out of the hole as far as the pencil collar and graphite. So, when using a pen refill my natural grip is right on the thickest and hardest part of that grip section. However, when I use the pencil, my natural grip falls a bit lower and I end up holding the very top of the black tip section which is actually rather comfortable. So, I end up with a comfortable grip when using the pencil but a hard and uncomfortable grip when using a pen giving the whole thing a rather schizoid experience.

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My other issue with the Accent is really nitpicking. Take a look at the picture below. Do you see what color indicator is located above the clip? Yup, it’s the red indicator. Really Lamy?! Why would you put the color most people use the least in the “home” position of a multipen? That’s just stupid! Unfortunately, the color indicators cannot be moved. Yes, I could put whatever refill I want in that position but do I really need to take a Stroop test when using a pen.

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Anyway, I’m not giving up on the Accent just yet. There is another version with a Palladium finish and a rubber grip section. If that rubber grip is more comfortable, and how could it not be, then I can learn to deal with the bizarre set up of the color indicators (Seriously Lamy, what the %$#@ were you thinking?!). The Accent 4Pen goes for about $75 which certainly is not cheap but given the materials and the build quality, it’s a reasonable sum. Should I find a good deal on the Palladium version someday then there is enough to like about the overall style and build quality to give the Accent 4Pen a second chance to become That One Pen.

 

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