I Know What I Like – Top 10 Pens and Pencils

Welcome to part 3 of the ongoing saga of I Know What I Like. Check out parts 1 and 2 if you have even more time to waste. I cover pens that have fallen out of favor in those previous installments. Today, we’ll cover the pens that have made the cut.

Before getting to the list of pens that have made it behind the velvet rope, let me just say that this narrowing process has been interesting and frustrating. Interesting because it made me assess what I like and how I actually use writing tools. The fact of the matter is that I do not have a lot of use cases for fountain pens. I just don’t, and I do not want to make you think I use fountains pen more than I do. It has been frustrating because, depending upon the day and my particular mood, a given pen may just make or miss the cut. Ultimately, this part 3 of I Know What I Like covers writing tools that, many more days than not, make the short list. Yes, I may flirt with other options but time and time again I find myself coming back to these choices. In an attempt to be fair, informative and easy to read, I limit myself to mentioning a few pros and cons of each item. Just know that, in my final estimation, the pros outweigh the cons for each item.

Pelikan Souveran K405 Ballpoint

Pelikan405

Pros:

  • Just look at it! A near perfect balance of sharpness and simplicity. I actually have an all blue K405 headed my way that I think I might like even more.
  • Takes the Parker Quinkflow refill. Yes, Parker Quinkflow may be boring and the blue ink may be a touch too purple, but it works for me.
  • The diameter of this pen is just about perfect for me.

Cons:

  • It is a touch (just a touch) too light. If it were ~1 gram heavier it would be perfect.
  • The clip on my K405 is not quite tight enough. It sits fine in a shirt pocket, but it can come loose if kept in a front jeans pocket as is my preference.

TWSBI Eco 

TWSBIEco

Pros:

  • TWSBI stainless steel nibs offer great price-to-quality ratios and the Eco uses nibs I have from other TWSBI pens.
  • Probably the best made fountain pen TWSBI produces. Unlike other TWSBIs, quality control does not seem to be an issue with this TWSBI edition.
  • Plenty of ink capacity
  • Feels great in my hand. I want to be in full control of a pen when I hold it. No slipperiness please! The Eco delivers on this point big time.
  • Piston filler on a fairly inexpensive pen is cool.

Cons:

  • Not the best looking pen I own. The “chunky” cap is a bit of a mismatch for the body and the reliance of rubber rings is a bit cheesy.
  • The cap can post, but it looks and feels silly when you do.

Tombow Mono/Mono 100 Pencil (F graphite)

TomboMono100

Pros:

  • I’m a lefty so I need graphite that does not smudge easily. I have tried many, many, many wood cased pencils and the Tombow Mono and Mono 100 in F offer the best balance of smudge resistance and smoothness hands down. I will not debate this point! Other opinions are simply wrong! Maybe it’s the F graphite, but the point retention is superior as well.
  • The quality control on these pencils is excellent. The graphite is always centered, the wood sharpens perfectly each and every time and the finish of every Mono or Mono 100 I own is as good as the next.

Cons:

  • It does not have an eraser. Some people don’t care about this. I do, but only a little. As you can see, I popped an eraser cap on mine. This does detract from the look a bit but I’m okay with that.
  • Not dirt cheap (~$1.20 per pencil on Amazon).

Pentel Twist-Erase Mechanical Pencil (usually 0.7 mm)

PentelTwistErase

Pros:

  • The grip material and diameter work well for me. These pencils got me through calculus, chemistry and physics tests back in the day so I think shared adversity breeds a bit of fondness.
  • The length of the pencil is almost perfect. I wish the clip were shorter or about 0.5 cm further from the point so as to completely avoid contact with my hand, but otherwise the length and balance are great.
  • Hey look, an actual eraser that (a) erases and (b) lasts more than 5 minutes on a mechanical pencil!
  • Very easy to find and cheap.

Cons:

  • Non-retractable tip can make it shallow-pocket unfriendly.
  • The clip is too tight. I have to work a bit to make sure the clip slides onto a pocket.

Edison Menlo Pump Filler

EdisonMenlo

Pros:

  • Look. At. It. Look. At. It. Again.
  • The stainless steel nib on this pen is the best nib I have ever used. Smooth but not too smooth and never skips.
  • The pump filling mechanism is fun.
  • The writing experience and balance work equally well for me capped and uncapped.
  • The hold and control I have on this pen is fantastic.

Cons:

  • This puppy was not cheap.
  • The material has a noticeable odor that took a few weeks to dissipate.
  • It’s a fountain pen so it does not get the use time that fully justifies its expense (that’s on me, not the pen).

Parker Jotter

ParkerJotter

Pros:

  • Classic design and color options galore! This may sound odd, but I feel more connected to the bygone days of analog workflow when using Jotters than I do with any other writing tool, including fountain pens. To me, a fountain pen can feel more like an extravagance than a call back to days gone by. Meanwhile, the Jotter is a more subtle and realistic connection to the past.
  • Obviously, it takes the aforementioned Parker Quinkflow refill that I prefer.
  • Fun to collect without breaking the bank.
  • The quality control of the older Jotters (brass threads) is outstanding.

Cons:

  • The diameter of most Jotters is on the thin side of acceptable for me.
  • Versions with the plastic threads can feel too light and cheap.

rOtring 800 Mechanical Pencil (in black and usually 0.7 mm)

Rotring800

Pros:

  • Weight, balance and grip are all near perfect for me. I do not know why, but silver rOtrings always feel too cold and slippery to my hand but the black versions, especially the 800, feel so much better.
  • The retractable tip makes this 100% pocket safe and adds a bit of a wow factor.
  • I was able to move the clip up just enough so that it does not interfere with my hand when writing.

Cons:

  • The diameter of the grip section is a hair too small for my perfect preferences.
  • Like most mechanical pencils, the eraser is an afterthought and replacements cost more than they should.

Delta Fusion 82

DeltaFusion82

Pros:

  • The fusion nib thing may be a bit goofy, but it works for me. Other than the nib on my Edison, this fusion nib is the best one I have in my collection and it was great right out of the box.
  • Weight, balance (posted or unposted) and grip of this pen all work for me.
  • The fine nib on this Delta is clearly finer than the fine nib on the Edison. If I want a true fine, I go with the Delta. If I want a medium-fine, I go with the Edison.
  • Given that the writing experiences are similar, this Delta was a much better deal than the Edison.

Cons:

  • I’m not thrilled with the color. I did get it for a good price (relatively speaking) but picking this color was a compromise. It’s a decent color, just not ideal.
  • Unlike the Edison, this fountain pen does not do as well with the rough and tumble of a backpack. It does not really leak, but the nib and interior of the cap can get a bit inky if the pen gets knocked around a bit.

Lamy 2000 Rollerball (w/ Pilot Juice refill)

Lamy2000

Pros:

  • This pen is the newest member of the short list and currently occupies a particular need. Specifically, it is the capped (non-retractable) pen I am using for the Pilot Juice refills I enjoy so much. The Render K G2 use to hold this spot (and may again some day), but I want a capped pen option for using Juice refills and the Lamy 2000 is it right now. (Small amount of hacking required)
  • Like all the Lamy 2000 pens, the fiberglass body feels great in my hand.
  • The spring clip works well – easy on, easy off without any lack of hold.

Cons:

  • The tiny metal bits on the grip section that hold the cap on can be distracting. I am past this issue but it is a thing to overcome.
  • You could easily spend $100 or more for this pen. You absolutely should not.

Tactile Turn Mover (w/ Pilot Juice refill)

TactileTurnMover

Pros:

  • Comes in a few different colors and materials so you have options. The “sand” colored aluminum version is shown here.
  • Metal pens can be hard to hold. The turns of the grip area are the best design answer to this issue I have seen. So simple yet so clever.
  • For me, this pen compliments the Lamy 2000 in that it is the retractable pen of choice for the Pilot Juice refills. My #1 grading pen is a TT Mover with a red Juice refill.
  • Weight and diameter generally work well for me. There are days I think it’s a touch to wide, but I’d rather it be a touch too wide than a touch too skinny.

Cons:

  • I will not call it a quality control problem, but I did return a blue Mover I bought through Massdrop to maker. To his credit, he could not have been nicer or quicker about addressing the issue.
  • You do need to be deliberate with the knock mechanism. This is not the knock for figgidy folks.

So there we have it. It turns out there are ten items here, so I guess we could call this my top 10 writing tools. If I never buy another pen in my life, I would be perfectly fine with these ten. I will still look for other options of course, but I will be more particular about what I buy from now on. If I do not think a pen or pencil has a chance of displacing one of these ten items, then I will likely pass on it.

Lastly, I hear some of you asking, “Great. But what is your one absolute favorite writing tool?” Well, if I had to pick just one it would clearly be the…

6 thoughts on “I Know What I Like – Top 10 Pens and Pencils

    1. I typically use the 0.5 mm refill. The 0.38 mm are too scratchy for my left handed pushing writing style. I might actually prefer the 0.7 mm in some cases, but they can be harder to find in the colors I prefer. For what it’s worth, in the world of gel pens, the Pentel Energel come in a close second for me.

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